Photo of Hiking Trails in Seattle, WA

The Best Hiking Trails in Seattle, WA

Explore Hiking Trails

Trail adventures within an hour of downtown

Seattle is one of the best cities in the United States for those who love the outdoors. With the Puget Sound and Olympia National Park to the west and Mount Rainier National Park to the south, the city is perfectly positioned for easy access to beautiful outdoor spaces. Of course, there are lots of great hikes within an hour drive of Seattle. So, we used the data from hundreds of thousands of hikes to make a list of the best hiking trails in Seattle, Washington.

If you’re looking for a challenging day hike, you cant go wrong with the Mount Si Trail. This one is particularly popular with local Strava members. If you’re in the mood for a family friendly stroll by the sea, head to the Discovery Park Loop Trail. Since all these hikes are popular with Strava members, you really can’t go wrong with any of the trails on this list!

It’s our mission to help you explore the world around you. Have fun out there, and be sure to share your adventure on Strava.

Top 10 hiking trails in Seattle, WA

1

Cable Like Trail to West Tiger #3

Hard
3.05 mi(1h 33m)·
2,029 ft
The Cable Line Trail to the summit of West Tiger #3 is a popular and challenging hike just a few miles west of Issaquah. Tiger mountain has 4 peaks, one to the east, then a cluster of 3 on the western side of the park. Locals call this peak T-3. The hike follows an out and back route. It’s steep the whole way, and most consider this a hard trail. “T-3” is one of the most popular hikes among Strava members in the Seattle Area. The views from the top are well worth the effort to get there!
2

Mount Si Trail

Hard
7.24 mi(3h 1m)·
3,152 ft
The Mount Si Trail is an epic day hike that takes you to just beneath the summit of Mount Si. The first half of the route winds through old growth forest then opens up to spectacular views of the surrounding area with Mt. Rainier to the south. If you’d like to reach the true summit, you can venture on another half mile up the Mt. Si Haystack Scramble. This adds to the challenge and adventure. The Mount Si Trail is one of the most hiked trails in the state and is extremely popular with local Strava members.
3

Rattlesnake Ledge Trail

Hard
4.36 mi(1h 36m)·
1,181 ft
The Rattlesnake Ledge Trail is a scenic and challenging hike with great views of the serene Rattlesnake lake. The trail follows an out and back route and is sure to give you a good workout. This trail is popular with local Strava members, and the views are said to be some of the best in Washington. There is also the option to extend the hike along the Rattlesnake Mountain Trail. If you’re feeling good up there, you can easily tack on a few extra miles.
4

Margaret's Way Trail to Debbie’s View

Hard
6.22 mi(2h 17m)·
1,689 ft
Margaret’s Way Trail takes you high into Squak Mountain State Park to a stunning south facing view of Mt. Rainier. The trail follows an out and back route. Because of the trail’s length and steep switchbacks, most consider this a hard hike. Debbie’s view is a fantastic place to pause for a moment and soak in the natural world. Here you’ll be able to see Mount Rainier in the distance. This trail is popular with local Strava members, so you’re sure to have a great time!
5

Little Si Trail

Hard
3.58 mi(1h 36m)·
1,200 ft
Little Si, Mount Si’s little sibling, is a fun hike with stunning views of the surrounding mountains and wilderness. The hike follows an out and back route with steep sections at the beginning and end of the trail. Because of these steep sections, most consider this a hard hike. The views from the summit, especially of the western slopes of Mount Si are extraordinary. Check out the photos from the community to get a sense of what you’ll see along the way.
6

Teneriffe Falls Trail

Hard
5.39 mi(2h 11m)·
1,514 ft
Get up close to one of the Seattle Area’s most picturesque waterfalls on the Teneriffe Falls Trail. This trail follows an out and back route that gets steeper near the falls. Because of the steep grades, most consider this a hard hike. Once you reach the falls, there are a few paths to explore. Just be sure to leave no trace. This trail is popular with local Strava members so you may make some friends out there!
7

Poo Poo Point Trail

Hard
6.43 mi(2h 16m)·
1,695 ft
Poo Poo point is a fun hiking trail just outside Issaquah. This particular route begins along the High School Trail then turns onto the Poo Poo Point Trail itself. The trail gets progressively steeper as you climb towards the summit. When you get there, keep an eye out for paragliders soaring above, as Poo Poo Point is one of the most popular spots around for this activity. Poo Poo Point is one of the most popular hikes in the Seattle area, and sure to be a great choice for a nearby adventure.
8

Discovery Park Loop Trail

Easy
2.91 mi(57m)·
291 ft
The Discovery Park Loop Trail is a welcoming hiking & walking trail along the Puget Sound in Seattle. The trail is perfect for beginner hikers, families with young children, or those just looking for a beautiful walk in the city. Strava members tend to take the loop clockwise but you can go either way! This loop is popular with local Strava members and visitors from out of town!
9

Twin Falls Trail

Hard
2.21 mi(1h 1m)·
556 ft
The Twin Falls Trail is a fun adventure to a set of waterfalls in the Olallie State Park. You’ll trek along the South Fork of the Snoqualmie River before reaching the falls. When you arrive, there are several options for exploring and taking pictures of the beautiful waterfall. The trail is on the shorter side, but there are some challenging bits, so you’re sure to get a good workout. The Twin Falls Trail is popular with local Strava members, so you might make some friends out there!
10

Mailbox Peak Old Trail

Hard
4.79 mi(3h 2m)·
3,949 ft
The Mailbox Peak Old Trail is legendary. It’s steep the whole way, it’s a challenge for even the most experienced hiker, and the views from the top are spectacular. At the summit, there’s a Mailbox with a book where you can leave your name on the list of those who’ve conquered this mighty trail. If you’d like to summit Mailbox Peak, but the old trail sounds a bit too intense, there’s also The New Trail. The New Trail covers the same ridge but uses large switchbacks to dramatically reduce the average gradient.